Governor A.B. Roman and the term "Dixie"                  January 26, 2015

On January 26, 1866, Andre Bienvenue ("A.B.") Roman passed away in New Orleans. Part of the Roman family dynasty in Louisiana, A.B. was brother to Jacques T. Roman, the owner of Oak Alley Plantation.

Governor A.B. Roman and the Term "Dixie"
 
On January 26, 1866, Andre Bienvenue ("A.B.") Roman passed away in New Orleans.  Part of the Roman family dynasty in Louisiana, A.B. was brother to Jacques T. Roman, the owner of Oak Alley Plantation.  There are many fascinating stories about the Roman family, and here is one about A.B.:
 
For many years, Louisiana was controlled by the French and the Spanish, and Oak Alley's Roman family first came here as French citizens at a time when Louisiana was a colony of that country.  Later, during Louisiana's Spanish ownership and then as part of the United States, the Roman family members held tight to their French-Creole heritage.
 
A.B. was twice governor of the State of Louisiana, and was responsible for the printing of the official state currency by the Citizens Bank of Louisiana, with a fascinating twist on the $10 bill.
 
On the front of the $10 bill, which is printed in English, we see an image of A.B. as Governor.  But in a nod to his heritage, A.B. had the back of the bill printed in French, highlighting the French word for ten, "Dix".  The notes became known as "Dixies" by English-speaking southerners, and history suggests that this was one of the reasons people began to refer to the southern United States as "Dixie."